06 February 2018

Wiltshire Police help students learn dangers of drug and drink

A car wreck and driving simulator helped Wiltshire College students understand the potential devastating consequences of drug and drink driving.

Officers from Wiltshire Police Road Safety Unit visited the Trowbridge, Chippenham and Lackham campuses during the last week of January as part of the College’s annual Health and Wellbeing fairs, which highlighted the importance of keeping safe and well in order for students to lead a positive and healthy lifestyle.

They were also informed about the dangers of driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs or being in a vehicle with someone who is and learned how easily drivers can become distracted in a simulator which allows students to see what happens when they look at their phone.

Wiltshire Police brought along a Renault Clio, which was involved in a fatal collision in Marlborough a few years ago.

The 21-year-old male driver was killed after losing control and colliding with a tree at speeds of 72 mph on a 15mph road.

Three passengers suffered varying injuries from cuts and bruises to life threatening and changing.

It was subsequently established that the driver was below the legal alcohol limit, but this was present alongside ketamine and cocaine.

Both the car and simulator had a big effect on students.

Albany Golledge, is a Level 3 Animal Management student studying at the Lackham campus.

The 19-year-old from Box said: “It was really hard to hear about the stories of those fatally injured in crashes or accidents around Wiltshire.

“It is very important though that we heard about them and I think it was really good to have it at college as it makes you think about your own actions.

“I think it also highlights just how quickly things can change.”

PC Phil Hackford is Traffic Manager South for the Road Safety Unit.

He said: “I’m passionate about teaching young people and adults about the dangers of drink and drug driving and think us coming in to talk to the students is effective.

“I’ve been a front line police officer and vehicle examiner so I’ve not only attended accidents such as the vehicle we brought with us but had to pull them apart in investigate what happened.

“My experience really helps as I have seen the devastating consequences from all angles and explain this to them.

“The crash car provides shock and awe as it shows what can and does happen and the crashes are all local which I think has an added effect.”

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